For this year’s election, you may vote in-person on election day, early at your local registrar’s office, OR if you requested an absentee ballot, you may complete it and drop it off at any drop-off location in your county or city. There is a drop-off location at your local registrar’s office, at every voter satellite office in your county or city, and on Election Day at each polling place in your county or city. If you drop off your absentee ballot, it MUST be returned in the sealed envelopes that are provided. Your county or city may also offer additional locations where you can drop-off your ballot.

With the potential for long lines at polling places and the unpredictable disruptions from COVID, I’d like to urge you to consider voting Absentee – whether by mail or in-person – this year. You are now able to vote absentee without a reason.

For more information on voting this year, please visit the Virginia Department of Elections here: https://www.elections.virginia.gov/casting-a-ballot/.

Important Dates to Know

Tuesday, October 13th – Deadline to register to vote, or update an existing registration
Friday, October 23rd at 5:00 PM – Deadline to request an absentee ballot to be mailed to you
Saturday, October 31st – Last day to vote absentee in-person
Tuesday, November 3rd – Voting Day; polls are open from 6:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Tuesday, November 3rd – Last Day to mail official ballots (must be postmarked by Nov 3rd)

Voting on Tuesday, November 3rd

Polling places are open from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. Anyone in line at 7:00 p.m. will be allowed to vote.
Voters may look up their polling place or they may contact their General Registrar for more information.

Look up your polling place here: https://www.elections.virginia.gov/citizen-portal/.
Look up your General Registrar here: https://vote.elections.virginia.gov/VoterInformation/PublicContactLookup/.

Early Voting In-Person

You can vote early at your local registrar’s office now until Saturday, October 31st. Before visiting your local registrar’s office, you may wish to check your registration status or call your registrar’s office. You can find your registrar’s phone number here. To vote early in-person, do the following:

  • Starting 45 days before Election Day, visit your local registrar’s office or a satellite voting location in your county or city to vote early. Remember, the Saturday before Election Day is the last day to vote early.
  • You do not have to have a reason or fill out an application to vote early.
  • At the registrar’s office or satellite voting location, you must provide your name and address and show an acceptable form of ID or sign an ID Confirmation Statement. To view a complete list of acceptable IDs, please visit the Voting In-Person page. If acceptable identification is not provided, you must sign an ID Confirmation Statement or a provisional ballot will be offered and you are allowed until the Friday at noon following the election to provide a copy of acceptable identification to the electoral board or sign
    an ID Confirmation Statement. Provisional voters receive a notice to remind them of the deadline and right to attend the electoral board meeting.
  • Accessible equipment and/or curbside voting is available upon request.

Applying to Vote Absentee by Mail

  • Download and complete the Vote by Mail Application Form.
  • Return the completed and signed form to your local registrar’s office by mail, fax, or scanned attachment to an email. Contact information for your local general registrar’s office is available using our online lookup tool.
  • After the registrar processes your application, you will receive your ballot in the mail. Please note: ballots can be mailed out to applicants starting 45 days prior to the relevant election date.
  • Carefully review the instructions to complete and return your ballot to your local registrar by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. If you are returning your ballot by-mail, it must be postmarked on or before Election Day and received by your registrar by noon on the third day after the election.

Track Your Ballot

If you have applied for an absentee ballot for 2020 November General Election, please follow this link to track your ballot.

After applying, you can check to see if your absentee application was received, and whether your ballot was sent and received by going to our Citizen Portal.

If It Is Your First Time Voting in Your County or City

In state and local elections, some first-time voters cannot vote absentee by mail. If you registered to vote by mailing in your voter registration application, and it is your first time voting in your locality, you cannot vote by mail in a state or local election unless you meet one of the following conditions:

  • You are a student attending college/university outside of your city/county of residence in Virginia
  • You have a disability or illness that prevents you from voting in person
  • You are pregnant
  • You are confined awaiting trial, or you are confined following conviction for a misdemeanor
  • You are active duty merchant marine or in the armed forces or a spouse or dependent of an active duty service member
  • You are temporarily residing outside of the United States
  • You have moved to another state less than thirty days before a Presidential election and you are requesting a ballot for Presidential and Vice-Presidential electors only
  • You are age 65 or older

Check with your local General Registrar to confirm your eligibility to vote absentee by mail. Special federal ID requirements apply to certain first-time voters.

Since the start of the year, I have been encouraging everyone to consider voting absentee this year. I am in strong support of absentee voting – whether that is in-person or by mail – and I believe both to be secure and valid. Officials have stated that the Post Office has enough funding available, the resources necessary, and full capacity to deliver absentee ballots that are mailed in during the upcoming election. The Post Office can handle roughly 471 million pieces of mail a day, and they have made assurances that they can handle the extra absentee ballots. I understand that people like the tradition of voting in-person on Election Day, but with the potential for long lines at polling places and unpredictable disruptions from COVID, I’d urge everyone to consider voting absentee this year.

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